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Google to begin removing inactive accounts later this year

What To Know

  • Google has announced that it will take action to remove inactive accounts later this year, prompting users to log back in if they wish to retain their accounts.
  • The company’s move is portrayed as an effort to enhance privacy, but it’s hard to ignore the potential cost-cutting benefits of freeing up storage space on Google’s servers.
  • Starting from an undisclosed date in the future, users with accounts inactive for at least two years will receive an email notification, warning them that their accounts will be deactivated if they fail to log in within 60 days.
  • In conclusion, Google’s upcoming initiative to remove inactive accounts is a proactive step to streamline storage and enhance user privacy.

Google has announced its plan to remove inactive accounts shortly. Starting later this year, inactive accounts that have been dormant for a certain period will be purged from the platform.

Google has announced that it will take action to remove inactive accounts later this year, prompting users to log back in if they wish to retain their accounts. The company’s move is portrayed as an effort to enhance privacy, but it’s hard to ignore the potential cost-cutting benefits of freeing up storage space on Google’s servers.

Starting from an undisclosed date in the future, users with accounts inactive for at least two years will receive an email notification, warning them that their accounts will be deactivated if they fail to log in within 60 days. After deactivation, users will have an additional 60 days to regain access before their accounts are permanently deleted.

In total, individuals will have about four months to recover their accounts, which appears to be a reasonable timeframe. Google has stated that the earliest it will begin deleting accounts is December 2023.

Google to remove inactive Accounts: User alert, Privacy enhancement, and Account Recovery Process

Warning emails will be sent to both the endangered accounts and any designated recovery email addresses. This deactivation and deletion process will apply to all associated services, including Gmail, Drive, Docs, YouTube, Google Photos, Meet, and Calendar. It’s important to note that this policy solely applies to personal accounts, and work or school-related email addresses will be exempt from the account purge.

While the privacy motive is cited as Google’s primary rationale, there is merit to this explanation. Inactive accounts are often less likely to have updated passwords and are ten times more susceptible to potential hijacking due to a lack of two-factor authentication.

To help users avoid account deletion, Google offers a web tool called Inactive Account Manager. This tool provides more frequent reminders about dormant accounts and allows users to determine the fate of their data.

Trusted contacts can be selected to receive alerts, and users can even download their account data if it is at risk of deactivation. In the unfortunate event of an account’s deletion, Google’s long-standing Takeout feature enables users to proactively view and export all their data.

In conclusion, Google‘s upcoming initiative to remove inactive accounts is a proactive step to streamline storage and enhance user privacy. Users are urged to log in and ensure the preservation of their accounts before the specified deadline.

By leveraging tools like Inactive Account Manager and Takeout, individuals can have greater control over their data and account management. Stay tuned for further updates from Google regarding this process.

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