Nintendo confirms live-action Zelda
Nintendo confirms live-action Zelda

Nintendo blocks Steam release of Wii and GameCube emulator

What To Know

  • Nintendo has effectively restricted the availability of Dolphin, an open-source emulator created exclusively for the Wii and GameCube, on the Steam platform.
  • This decision was made by Nintendo in response to a legal notification sent by the corporation, also known as a “cease and desist” order.
  • It is worth noting that the initial blog post regarding this matter solely mentioned the involvement of a DMCA notification.
  • However, it has since been revised to emphasize that the situation was a result of legal actions taken by both the Company and the Dolphin development team, including the exchange of removal requests and a cease-and-desist dialogue.

Nintendo has effectively restricted the availability of Dolphin, an open-source emulator created exclusively for the Wii and GameCube, on the Steam platform. This decision was made by Nintendo in response to a legal notification sent by the corporation, also known as a “cease and desist” order.

As a result, Dolphin’s developers issued a public statement announcing that the emulator’s availability on Steam will be severely delayed. The grounds for Nintendo’s lawsuit are specified in the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), which governs copyright infringement in digital environments.

It is worth noting that the initial blog post regarding this matter solely mentioned the involvement of a DMCA notification. However, it has since been revised to emphasize that the situation was a result of legal actions taken by both the Company and the Dolphin development team, including the exchange of removal requests and a cease-and-desist dialogue. This additional information was conveyed by Pierre Bourdon, a longstanding contributor to the Dolphin project.

One possible reason for Nintendo’s objection to Dolphin is related to the distribution of the Wii AES-128-disc encryption. Bourdon explained that Dolphin’s source code has included the Wii’s “common key” for many years, eliminating the need for users to provide the key themselves. This aspect may have contributed to Nintendo’s request to block the emulator.

Unlike a typical DMCA takedown, Dolphin’s creators do not have legal recourse to challenge Nintendo’s action in this case. They are at the mercy of Valve, the platform owner, who could have chosen to disregard Nintendo’s request without facing any consequences.

It is worth noting that another emulator called RetroArch is available on the Steam platform. However, RetroArch functions differently from Dolphin. RetroArch serves as a front that allows users to load various emulator “cores” within it, providing a centralized interface for configuring software settings across different emulators.

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