Reddit
Reddit

Reddit Blackout: Subreddits Vow to continue protest despite CEO’s downplay

What To Know

  • Apollo for Company, a highly popular third-party app, has made the unfortunate announcement that it will be forced to cease its operations due to the recent changes implemented by the Company.
  • As a solo developer responsible for the app, the individual behind Apollo for the company expressed their inability to afford the substantial API costs, which now amount to $20 million per year.
  •  Reddark, a website that monitors the participation of subreddits in the blackout, indicates that the protest is showing signs of expansion.
  • Even as Tuesday evening approached, a time when the protest would be expected to wind down, the number of subreddits joining the blackout continued to rise.

The 48-hour Reddit “Blackout” is nearing its conclusion. Nevertheless, the company’s nonchalant approach to this matter, which has evoked strong emotions among many users, could potentially have negative consequences. As a result, the planned two-day protest may be extended indefinitely in certain subreddit communities.

On Monday, a significant number of subreddits decided to go private, effectively blocking access to the vast amount of content that has accumulated within each specialized community. The reason behind this action is to protest recent changes made by the company, specifically the discontinuation of free API access for developers. Instead, the company is introducing a new pricing structure where developers will have to pay based on their usage for API access to support their applications.

Apollo for Company, a highly popular third-party app, has made the unfortunate announcement that it will be forced to cease its operations due to the recent changes implemented by the Company. As a solo developer responsible for the app, the individual behind Apollo for the company expressed their inability to afford the substantial API costs, which now amount to $20 million per year.

Uncertainty Surrounds the Duration of Reddit’s API Protest as Subreddits Consider Indefinite Extension

As we move ahead to the present day, significant developments have unfolded. On Tuesday, after more than 24 hours of ongoing protest, The Verge released an internal memo from Reddit CEO Steve Huffman. In the memo, Huffman sought to diminish the significance of the users’ protests and downplayed their impact.

Huffman’s response to the ongoing protest was captured in his statement: “There’s a significant amount of noise surrounding this issue, with some of the loudest we’ve encountered. I want to assure you that our teams are actively addressing it, and similar to previous controversies on Reddit, this too shall pass.”

Continuing his statement, Huffman emphasized the importance of fulfilling their commitments: “We must follow through on what we have promised.” His remark directly addressed the core issue that sparked the protest—the company’s intention to introduce exorbitant fees for API access, affecting developers.

Furthermore, Huffman acknowledged that the company has not observed any substantial revenue consequences thus far as a result of the ongoing protest.

The company is making concerted efforts to swiftly address the protests and proceed with the introduction of its paid API scheduled for next month. The company aims to boost its revenue as it sets its sights on going public later this year.

Nevertheless, the resolution of the protest may not be as straightforward as anticipated. There is a possibility that the protest will extend beyond the initial 48-hour period. Reddark, a website that monitors the participation of subreddits in the blackout, indicates that the protest is showing signs of expansion.

When Apollo for company, the largest app impacted by the API changes, initially declared its shutdown, approximately 3,000 subreddits had confirmed their participation in the API protest. However, as the protests commenced on Monday morning, the number surged to over 6,500 subreddits that chose to go dark in solidarity. The impact was so significant that the company experienced temporary downtime during the protest.

Even as Tuesday evening approached, a time when the protest would be expected to wind down, the number of subreddits joining the blackout continued to rise. Surpassing the previous count, more than 8,400 subreddits have now opted to go private in support of the API protest.

As of Tuesday evening, all but one of the 47 subreddits boasting over 10 million members had joined the protest, leaving only r/photoshopbattles unaffected. This collective action includes some of the largest communities on the platform, such as r/funny with over 40 million members.

Notably, prominent subreddits like r/aww, r/gaming, r/Music, r/science, and r/todayilearned, each with over 30 million members, have also chosen to go private in solidarity.

YouTube player

Comments

No comments yet. Why don’t you start the discussion?

Leave a Reply