Spotify offers refunds
Spotify offers refunds

Spotify offers refunds for soon-to-be-bricked Car thing device

What To Know

  • The company announced on Thursday that customers with proof of purchase, such as an emailed invoice, can contact customer service for a refund.
  • The situation escalated when Billboard reported a class-action lawsuit filed in the US District Court for the Southern District of New York on May 28.
  • It’s important to note that Spotify claims to have started offering refunds before the lawsuit was filed, suggesting the refunds were not a direct response to the legal action but perhaps a proactive measure to address potential lawsuits.
  • If you’ve previously been denied a refund, it’s recommended to contact Spotify customer service again, as the policy to issue refunds has been in place since May 24.

Spotify has quietly started offering refunds for its Car Thing device, which will be deactivated on December 9, 2024. The company announced on Thursday that customers with proof of purchase, such as an emailed invoice, can contact customer service for a refund. This refund policy has been in effect since last Friday.

The decision to disable Car Thing is part of Spotify’s strategy to streamline its product offerings and focus on developing new features for a better user experience. This move has faced significant backlash, particularly from Gen Z users on TikTok, and through direct complaints to Spotify on platforms like X (formerly Twitter) and via customer support channels.

TechCrunch reports that many users initially faced difficulty getting refunds, with some only offered a few months of free Premium access instead. Others were told no refunds would be provided. However, it seems these interactions may have occurred before Spotify began issuing refunds on May 24.

The situation escalated when Billboard reported a class-action lawsuit filed in the US District Court for the Southern District of New York on May 28. The lawsuit accuses Spotify of misleading customers by selling a $90 product that would soon become obsolete without offering refunds.

It’s important to note that Spotify claims to have started offering refunds before the lawsuit was filed, suggesting the refunds were not a direct response to the legal action but perhaps a proactive measure to address potential lawsuits.

If you purchased a Car Thing device and have proof of purchase, you should be eligible for a refund. If you’ve previously been denied a refund, it’s recommended to contact Spotify customer service again, as the policy to issue refunds has been in place since May 24.

This development highlights the challenges companies face when discontinuing products and the importance of clear communication and customer support in managing transitions. Spotify’s response to the backlash by offering refunds is a step towards mitigating customer dissatisfaction and legal repercussions.

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