Threads hashless tags invite silly trolling
Threads hashless tags invite silly trolling

Threads hashless tags invite silly trolling

What To Know

  • Despite the simplicity of the feature, users have found a clever way to pull off a prank.
  • A Threads user creates a post, preferably with a substantial amount of text, and inserts a “Show more” tag at the end, seemingly interrupting a word or sentence.
  • When an unsuspecting user clicks “Show more” to view the remainder of the post, they are redirected to the page for that specific tag, resulting in a surprise twist akin to being Rick Rolled.
  • The first recorded instance of this prank can be traced back to Threads user @freezydorito, who, according to their bio and professional pages, is associated with Meta.

Meta recently introduced searchable tags, akin to hashtags, for all Threads users on its microblogging platform, Threads. Users have discovered a quirky way to have some light-hearted fun with this new feature. Threads’ “topic tags” closely resemble hashtags, with a notable difference – they lack the hash symbol (#) and can include spaces.

This allows the tags to appear like regular phrases, diverging from the conventional practice of stringing words together on platforms like Twitter and X. Similar to hashtags, they are highlighted in blue and linked to other posts containing the same tag.

Despite the simplicity of the feature, users have found a clever way to pull off a prank. A Threads user creates a post, preferably with a substantial amount of text, and inserts a “Show more” tag at the end, seemingly interrupting a word or sentence.

When an unsuspecting user clicks “Show more” to view the remainder of the post, they are redirected to the page for that specific tag, resulting in a surprise twist akin to being Rick Rolled.

Even seasoned users have fallen victim to this seemingly innocuous prank, mistaking it for a bug. The first recorded instance of this prank can be traced back to Threads user @freezydorito, who, according to their bio and professional pages, is associated with Meta.

The effectiveness of this trick lies in its replication of a familiar UI element, creating a deceptive yet convincing appearance. The blue link, resembling the traditional look of X, adds to the authenticity.

While the trick may lose its novelty over time, the influx of new Threads users, particularly with the recent European launch, suggests potential longevity. It remains to be seen how quickly Meta will respond to potentially tweak this amusing exploit.

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